Freyja Knapp Publishes Article on E-waste Recycling and Mining

Freyja’s article in Environment and Planning A examines the move by large multinational refineries to recycle e-waste and other secondary goods instead of refining “traditional” ores and concentrates extracted from subterranean mines.  You can find the article here (or here for an accepted version that can be downloaded free).

“The birth of the flexible mine: Changing geographies of mining and the e-waste commodity frontier”

Abstract:
Mining companies, in recent decades, have been changing how they source and refine ores by seeking metal-bearing wastes to be smelted alongside “traditional” mining concentrates. I propose the term “flexible mine” to describe this expansion of ore supply chains, and I demonstrate how it operates through multiple registers of flexibility: spatial, temporal, and interpretational. The flexible mine is both a “widening” and a “deepening” commodity frontier for the mining industry promising a disarticulation from geophysical processes and, by extension, mining country geopolitics. The organizational and technical changes associated with mining above-ground ores seem to suggest a new phenomenon, wholly different than traditional mining and refining. Instead, however, the mining of waste streams blurs the boundaries between extraction, production, manufacturing, consumption, and disposal. Further, the flexible mine challenges the distinction between urban and non, arguing against relying on too-familiar binaries in geographic scholarship. I highlight how these registers of flexibility address three problems in below-ground mining (geospatial fixity, resource scarcity, and environmental effects) and also create new governance challenges in regulating extractive industries.

Nancy Peluso publishes stunning photo essay on gold mining in Indonesia

Professor Peluso writes: “Smallholder gold mining has exploded across Indonesia over the last 20 years. Each site has its own history and manners of working; each pit or shaft within the broader mining sites experiences trajectories of boom and bust. Both the mining activities and the gold produced in these sites compete with those from the gigantic corporate miners known around the world: Freeport, Newmont, and Aurora. Though ‘small-scale’—in the sense that crews work at the direction of a mining boss/small businessman who runs the operations with his or her own money or others’ investments—its effects generate as much shock and awe to the uninitiated observer as do those of their corporate counterparts.”

Read more and view her photographs here!